Financial, Money & Stocks

Management Accounting, February 1988







Management Accounting, January 1988







Stock Market, February 1982


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CAPTION: "And the beauty of it is, it's all tax-free!"






The Wall Street Journal, March 9, 1959







The Wall Street Journal, July 1, 1959







Stock Market, November/December 1983







Barron's, June 29, 1998







Stock Market, December 1980


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CAPTION: "Our bellies are up 12 1/2 cents."

Stock Market was publishing quite a few of my cartoons at one time. In fact, for a while I even had a featured by-line, under the title "The Bottom Line". The magazine folded, and that was the end of that.






Advertising Age, September 12, 1983


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Explanation: The word "collateral" has a special meaning in the advertising agency world. To quote from a source on Google: "Collateral is the collection of media used to support sales of a product or service. It differs from advertising in that it is used later in the sales cycle. Common examples include: sales brochures and other printed product information, posters and signs, visual aids in sales presentations, web content, sales scripts and demonstration scripts."

So this adman, or as we would call him today, Madman, is looking for a loan and he has brought along his "collateral". Yes, I agree it's an awful pun, but I thought it worked as a gag, and apparently so did the editors at Advertising Age back in 1983.

End of Lesson Number 1 in today's Advertising 101 class.






The Wall Street Journal, April 27, 1970


wsj042770.JPG This is another WSJ cartoon in which a lot of drawing detail was mysteriously lost in the reproduction. As I mentioned previously in a reply to a comment on another WSJ cartoon, there was a period of time when, for some strange reason, the "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoons were appearing so faintly that they almost disappeared. I remember a few Joe Mirachi cartoons that looked like a bunch of chicken scratchings, and you could barely tell what the drawings were supposed to represent. My guess is that the WSJ was experimenting with different scanning or copying techniques, and somewhere between the original drawing and the printed cartoon, almost all of the detail was being lost. I know I hadn't changed my drawing style or tools, so it certainly wasn't anything that we cartoonists were doing differently. I also recall that the problem prompted at least one sarcastic Letter to the Editor complaining about the "disappearing" cartoons.

I'm glad to say that the glitch, whatever it was, was finally resolved and the cartoon reproduction returned to normal.






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