Cartoons

National Review, February 14, 1986


natrev021486.jpg A few days ago I posted another National Review cartoon and made some remarks about the untimely death of its founder, William Buckley, Jr. I also mentioned his sister Priscilla, who was an editor at NR and for many years had the responsibility of selecting the cartoons to be published there.

Ms Buckley would often comment on my submissions, and today I'd like to recall one particular comment of hers, from about twenty years ago.

In my batch of cartoons at that time was a kind of silly one in which I had an 18th century King of France watching television. The caption, coming from the TV set, was "It's ten P.M. -- do you know where your Dauphins are?". This, of course, was a take-off on the familiar and oft-repeated TV phrase "It's ten P.M. -- do you know where your children are?".

When I received the batch back, there was a note from Ms Buckley. She said, "I liked the 'Dauphins' but by definition there can be only one Dauphin at a time, like the Prince of Wales."

I scratched my head for a while, then looked it up and realized that she was perfectly right. The Dauphin was the heir apparent to the throne of France, and there couldn't possibly be more than one at a time.

I tried re-writing my caption, but somehow " . . . do you know where your Dauphin is?" didn't work at all. I finally gave up and relegated the cartoon to my vast "Unsold" folders.






National Review, March 16, 1992


natrev031692.jpg This cartoon is from the National Review. I was truly shocked two days ago to learn about the death of William Buckley, Jr., NR's founder and linchpin.

Mr. Buckley's sister, Priscilla, an editor at NR, handled the cartoons there for many years, until her retirement in 1991.

No, I didn't agree with most of Mr. Buckley's views, but he certainly made life exciting and entertaining. As The New York Times said in its obit yesterday, "He was often described as liberals' favorite conservative". Amen. And, surely, this will be the first and last occasion that the Times will use the phrase "sesquipedalian spark of the right" in a headline on its front page (look up the word in your big dictionary, as I did).

I always liked to imagine that my cartoons made Mr. Buckley laugh. Oh, and I also enjoyed reading his sailing yarns immensely. Rest in peace, Mr. Buckley.






"The Professional School of Cartooning" (1947)


By popular demand (from Mike Lynch), here are profiles of the five other instructors on the staff of "The Professional School of Cartooning". For further details, see my posting in "Eli's Corner" dated January 2, 2008, about the four cartooning Roth brothers. Lariar.jpgBoltinoff.jpgNofziger.jpgwolfe.jpgschus.jpg I wish I could give you updates on all these cartoonists, but I have very little info to impart. All of them were prolific and popular gag cartoonists in 1947. Of course, Lawrence Lariar (apparently the founder and "Executive Director" of this correspondence school) was also a Cartoon Editor for several major publications, and also an anthologist of a great many cartoon book collections.

Wow, Adolph Schus was selling cartoons in 1926 -- now, that makes me feel young!






The Wall Street Journal, December 1, 2000


wsj120100.jpg Notice that WSJ cropped my drawing, on the bottom, and then had to re-position my signature.






More memorabilia - the four cartooning Roth brothers


I came across an old promotional brochure for "The Professional School of Cartooning" (Lawrence Lariar, Executive Director), from 1947 or 1948. Four of the featured instructors were the Roth brothers, gag cartoonists who each achieved varied levels of success in the profession. Only one of them, Ben Roth, retained the family name in print. His brothers worked under the pen names of Irving Roir, Salo and Al Ross. You probably recognize the name of Al Ross as the famed "New Yorker" cartoonist. I believe he's still actively cartooning, even though I haven't seen his work in "The New Yorker" for a long time. Here are their photos and sample cartoons, from the brochure: Roth Bros- - Al.jpgRoth Bros-- Ben.jpgRoth Bros- - Salo.jpgRoth Bros- - Roir.jpg Why my interest in the Roth brothers? I thought you'd never ask. My wife and I first traveled to Israel in 1983, and in our small mini-bus group were Ellen and Herb Deutsch of Buffalo Grove, Illinois. Our conversations eventually (and inevitably) got around to my gag cartooning, and Ellen reported excitedly that not only was her father a gag cartoonist, but so were her three uncles. I, of course, responded that they could only be the four Roth brothers. Ellen was amazed that I had heard of her father and uncles and I was amazed at what an incredibly small world we live in.

Which of the Roth brothers was her father? I'm sorry to say that I don't remember. But I'm sure that someone out there will supply that little bit of information . . . please!!

Oh, one more thing. My mother's maiden name was Roth, but I'm sure that's just another weird coincidence.






The Wall Street Journal, February 8, 1982


wsj020882.JPG As I mentioned before, there was a short period of time when The Wall Street Journal was reproducing cartoons very poorly and a lot of drawing detail was being lost. This is one of those cartoons. That's a Universal Product Code (UPC) emblem on the gentleman's party tag.

(Update, posted October 22, 2016) I just discovered the original of this cartoon -- this is the way it should have looked in print:






Nutrition Health Review, Fall 1991


nutrfall91.JPG This is another one of my personal favorites. Try as I might over the years, I couldn't convince any of my "major" markets to buy any version of this cartoon, and it finally ended up in Nutrition Health Review in 1991 (I guess NHR figured that the psychiatrist setting made it health-related).

I still feel very sorry that it didn't get snapped up by The Wall Street Journal or National Review or some similar publication. The caption is still relevant, and could be used today without alteration.






Three Fines, two Tippits and a VIP


Here are some more panels that appeared in "Memos from Gurney Williams". Mr Williams was, among other things, Cartoon Editor of LOOK magazine in the 1950's, and he published a monthly "Memos" to be picked up and read by the cartoonists who visited him on Wednesday, which was Cartoon "Look Day". For more details, see my previous postings on the subject in "Eli's Corner".

Anyway, here are three more "How Not to Get an Okay" panels by Stan Fine, two panels of "The Rat Race" by Jack Tippit and last, but certainly not least, a VIP (Virgil Partch). These all involved cartoonists commenting on this crazy business of magazine gag cartooning. More to come in future postings. How Not To 23.JPGHow Not To 8.JPGHow Not to 22.JPGtippit no- 6.JPGtippit no-2.JPGvirgilpartch.JPG






Cartooning memorabilia


I found another tearsheet from an old magazine in my files, with photos of these three cartoonists. Don't know what magazine it was, but I suspect it was an art or literary publication from the 50's (maybe like today's "Writer's Digest").

Below each photo I've typed in the captions exactly as they appeared. Now, I don't know of a cartoonist named "Barney Tobin", and I suspect that was a typo for "Barney Tobey". Does anyone recognize him or the cartoon he's working on?

If I'm mistaken and there really is a cartoonist named Barney Tobin, my sincerest apologies. Rube Goldberg photo.JPG Caption: "The craziest inventions of them all, courtesy -- lo, these many years -- of veteran Rube Goldberg." whitney darrow photo.JPG Caption: " 'I dreamt I stepped outside for a breath of fresh air . . . without my Maiden-form Bra.' Not the caption for one of Whitney Darrow's famous cartoons, but for the subtle, delicate drawing behind his head." barney tobey photo.JPG Caption: "Drawingboard, paper, pen, sneakers, checked sportshirt -- the paraphrenelia of the successful cartoonist, as becomingly modeled by Barney Tobin." [Barney Tobey??]






Sun Magazine, August 27, 2007







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