Category: National Review

National Review, June 10, 1988

natrev061088.jpg

Explanation: Back in those days, some people weren't happy with the “liberal” leanings of the U.S. Supreme Court, headed by Chief Justice Earl Warren. This cartoon was a natural for William Buckley's conservative publication, National Review, although I didn't draw it with that magazine in mind. I was kind of hoping that The New Yorker or The Wall Street Journal would nibble on it, but apparently that was not meant to be.

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National Review, February 14, 1986

natrev021486.jpg A few days ago I posted another National Review cartoon and made some remarks about the untimely death of its founder, William Buckley, Jr. I also mentioned his sister Priscilla, who was an editor at NR and for many years had the responsibility of selecting the cartoons to be published there.

Ms Buckley would often comment on my submissions, and today I'd like to recall one particular comment of hers, from about twenty years ago.

In my batch of cartoons at that time was a kind of silly one in which I had an 18th century King of France watching television. The caption, coming from the TV set, was "It's ten P.M. — do you know where your Dauphins are?". This, of course, was a take-off on the familiar and oft-repeated TV phrase "It's ten P.M. — do you know where your children are?".

When I received the batch back, there was a note from Ms Buckley. She said, "I liked the 'Dauphins' but by definition there can be only one Dauphin at a time, like the Prince of Wales."

I scratched my head for a while, then looked it up and realized that she was perfectly right. The Dauphin was the heir apparent to the throne of France, and there couldn't possibly be more than one at a time.

I tried re-writing my caption, but somehow " . . . do you know where your Dauphin is?" didn't work at all. I finally gave up and relegated the cartoon to my vast "Unsold" folders.

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National Review, March 16, 1992

natrev031692.jpg This cartoon is from the National Review. I was truly shocked two days ago to learn about the death of William Buckley, Jr., NR's founder and linchpin.

Mr. Buckley's sister, Priscilla, an editor at NR, handled the cartoons there for many years, until her retirement in 1991.

No, I didn't agree with most of Mr. Buckley's views, but he certainly made life exciting and entertaining. As The New York Times said in its obit yesterday, "He was often described as liberals' favorite conservative". Amen. And, surely, this will be the first and last occasion that the Times will use the phrase "sesquipedalian spark of the right" in a headline on its front page (look up the word in your big dictionary, as I did).

I always liked to imagine that my cartoons made Mr. Buckley laugh. Oh, and I also enjoyed reading his sailing yarns immensely. Rest in peace, Mr. Buckley.

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Foreword

Welcome to the Eli Stein Cartoon archive. To begin, read my introduction and personal notes, and then please look at the cartoons, which are categorized by either decade, publication name or topic. I’ve included some personal comments, memories and photos below many of the cartoons. I’ll be adding cartoons, memories and photos ad infinitum. Remember, your comments are appreciated (just click on the “comment” link at the bottom of each post).
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