1990's

Barron's February 17, 1997


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The first cartoon of mine that was printed by Barron's, another Dow-Jones publication (D-J's Wall Street Journal and National Business Employment Weekly both extensively bought my stuff).






The National Law Journal September 3, 1998


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Another of many cartoons I've done for The National Law Journal (the first one was published ten years earlier, in 1988). I particularly like this one because R.J.Nagle is my son-in-law -- but he's not a lawyer.






Florida Bar News, September 1, 1998


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My caption for this cartoon was a much longer one, starting with "Try me . . . " and then going on with a sentence containing the punch line. The cartoon editor of Florida Bar News sent me a note saying she'd like to buy the cartoon, but wanted to run it with just "Try me." as the caption. No way, I replied indignantly, explaining that it simply wasn't a funny caption. She was insistent and I finally caved in, figuring she was the customer. . . she was paying for it . . . it was her publication, etc. Well, that was a long time ago, but I still feel the same way and I'm still curious -- does anybody see any humor in this cartoon as it was finally published?






The Wall Street Journal, June 20, 1997


wsj062097.jpg It's time to write about my cartoon names again. Every once in a while, I feel like I need a generic last name on a sign or in a caption, like "Whitmore" above. My favorite name of choice was, and still is, "Nagle". Richard Nagle is my son-in-law, and I've used his name so often that he rates a separate "Topics" category listing. I've also used the name "Farber" a few times, and as I've explained before, that was my little tribute to radio talk show host Barry Farber. I used to listen to him a lot as I cartooned late into the night. Barry Farber is still around, by the way -- I heard him a few days ago, phoning into a talk show.

As for the name "Whitmore", that goes back to my Army days in the early 1950's. Lieutenant Whitmore was one of the few "good" officers I came in contact with (as opposed to all those other officers who lorded it all over us lowly enlisted men). For instance, you could actually have a conversation with Lt. Whitmore and not have to worry about the consequences afterwards. I distinctly remember telling my cartooning Army buddy, Tom Wesselmann, that I had found my "cartoon name", and that it was going to be "Whitmore". Tom smiled knowingly and acknowledged that it was a good choice.

I've written about my Army days before in these archives, and you'll find all the postings under "Eli's Corner". The last one is right here.

So here's to you, Lieutenant Whitmore -- I'm sorry I don't remember your first name, but "Lieutenant" has always been good enough for me.






National Business Employment Weekly, January 24, 1993


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Yes, I admit it, I think this has got to be one of my top five best cartoons ever. I love everything about it. Simple drawing, cleverly-worded caption and, when you finally get to the door, downright funny. Why The New Yorker ever rejected it is beyond me.

(Just to bring this into historical context -- in 1993, when this was printed, the U.S. was in the midst of a major unemployment crisis. It was before the age of computer job searches, and laid-off workers were sending out tons of resumes. But corporations were not yet in a hiring mode, and the resumes were mostly being ignored.)






The Wall Street Journal, December 18, 1997 and December 22, 1998


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Yes, that's absolutely correct, The Wall Street Journal printed this cartoon on December 18, 1997 and apparently liked it so much that they printed the exact same cartoon again a year later, on December 22, 1998. As one of my sons asked me in '98, "Did you get paid for it again?" I'm almost certain that the answer was no. So it looks like you owe me one, WSJ.

Actually, over the years, this type of thing happened to me on several occasions with other publications (but only this one time with The Wall Street Journal). Whenever it occured, I always chalked it up to either incredibly poor record-keeping or innocent human error. I can't imagine that any publication would deliberately want to repeat a cartoon that it had printed before.

Well, "to err is human, to forgive, divine". So all is forgiven, WSJ.






Selling Power, March 1999







The Chronicle of Higher Education, August 11, 1992







Report to Legal Management, March 1993


report0393.jpg Okay, so here's my beef with some (certainly not all) publications: they change my captions, without asking permission! My caption for this cartoon was "I'm a management guru -- the regular guru is two mountains over." I wish I knew which editor decided to change "a management" to "the quality" -- I would have loved to tell him or her that the change ruined a perfectly acceptable gag.

I'm happy to report that most publications wouldn't dream of changing the wording of a caption without asking permission. I've even been contacted by phone by editors who wanted to make a change, but wouldn't do it without asking first.






National Review, March 16, 1992


natrev031692.jpg This cartoon is from the National Review. I was truly shocked two days ago to learn about the death of William Buckley, Jr., NR's founder and linchpin.

Mr. Buckley's sister, Priscilla, an editor at NR, handled the cartoons there for many years, until her retirement in 1991.

No, I didn't agree with most of Mr. Buckley's views, but he certainly made life exciting and entertaining. As The New York Times said in its obit yesterday, "He was often described as liberals' favorite conservative". Amen. And, surely, this will be the first and last occasion that the Times will use the phrase "sesquipedalian spark of the right" in a headline on its front page (look up the word in your big dictionary, as I did).

I always liked to imagine that my cartoons made Mr. Buckley laugh. Oh, and I also enjoyed reading his sailing yarns immensely. Rest in peace, Mr. Buckley.






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