Signs

Sun, March 7, 2005







King Features "New Breed", August 25, 2001







The National Enquirer, January 15, 1985







The Wall Street Journal, November 10, 1969







Nutrition Health Review, Winter 1983







The Wall Street Journal, March 28, 1980







The Wall Street Journal, October 4, 1977







Boardroom Lists, November 1983


bdrm1183.jpg This was published by Brian Kurtz in his Boardroom Lists newsletter in November 1983. You can see my original posting about Boardroom Lists here. The interesting thing about this particular cartoon is that Brian told me he liked it so much that he wanted to make a poster out of it. I told him it sounded like a great idea. The next thing I knew he published this 17" x 22" poster . . . drawn by the renowned New Yorker cartoonist Charles Barsotti! bdrmbarsottiposter.jpg I was quite taken aback and I never got a good explanation from Brian as to why he chose to ask Barsotti to re-draw my gag, instead of just blowing up my cartoon (which he had already published months before). I guess I can't fault Brian for going with a famous New Yorker cartoonist (Barsotti), instead of an almost no-name cartoonist (me). Anyway, I did eventually get my chance at a poster, too. For the opening of the 1986 baseball season, I drew a special cartoon for Boardroom Lists, and it was published (size 17" x 22", on beige poster stock paper) in May 1986. You can see it directly below.






Case & Comment, 1988


case1988.jpg

Case & Comment was a well-respected, old-line publication for lawyers. Its first issue was in 1894 and its last was in 1990 -- almost 100 years! And best of all, in my opinion, it used cartoons to accompany and lighten up all that legal material.

This cartoon was purchased by the editors for a specific purpose. It was featured in a June 1988 promotional letter sent to their extensive mailing list of lawyers. I was paid a $100 bonus for that use.

Unfortunately, they must have sent it to the law firm that represented the "Toys R Us" merchandising group. As the editors later informed me, it resulted in a "cease and desist" letter and Case & Comment was forced to discontinue the promotion.

Aside: Four years later, The National Law Journal (another one of my markets, by the way) published essentially the same cartoon, but drawn by another cartoonist. The other cartoonist had the chutzpah to use the reverse "R" (Torts "R" Us), which I had been too chicken to use. I figured it was trademarked and would just be asking for trouble. I often wondered whether The National Law Journal received a similar "cease and desist" letter from the Toys "R" Us lawyers.






Sun Magazine, August 27, 2007







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