Stock Market Magazine

Stock Market, May 1984







Stock Market, August 1983


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I've seen this gag "covered" countless times, in various disguises, by other cartoonists. I really don't know if this 1983 version of mine was the first to appear, but at least it was one of the earliest.






Stock Market, June 1978


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CAPTION: "My answer is a qualified yes."






Stock Market, February 1982


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CAPTION: "And the beauty of it is, it's all tax-free!"






Stock Market, February 1985







Stock Market, November/December 1983







Stock Market, October 1983


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CAPTION: "No, you're not being replaced by a computer, Hoskins . . . you're being replaced by an electric paper shredder."






Stock Market, May 1978


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CAPTION: ". . . and the Board of Directors voted to wish you a speedy recovery -- 5 to 4, with two abstentions."






Stock Market, December 1980


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CAPTION: "Our bellies are up 12 1/2 cents."

Stock Market was publishing quite a few of my cartoons at one time. In fact, for a while I even had a featured by-line, under the title "The Bottom Line". The magazine folded, and that was the end of that.






Stock Market, March 1981


stkmkt0381.JPG Am I the only person who saw any humor in the name of the securities firm "Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Beane"? And then, many years ago, they abruptly changed the name to "Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith", which really raised my gag antennae. The firm is now called simply "Merrill Lynch" -- a ho-hum name if I ever heard one.

Anyhow, I came up with this "OUT TO LYNCH" gag and Stock Market magazine was good enough to print it. Please don't go looking for any deep-South racial undertones in the cartoon -- this was simply a take-off on the countless "Out to Lunch" door sign cartoons that every cartoonist liked to draw, probably because they were so easy. Eventually it became such a hackneyed subject that no cartoonist would touch it anymore (also, for some reason, business people no longer seemed inclined to hang "Out to Lunch" signs on their doorknobs).

So these three partners, with their darkened offices, were simply out to visit with good ol' Merrill Lynch, whose office is still lit up.

One more historical note, for the sake of honesty in cartooning: there is no such person as Merrill Lynch, and there never has been. The firm was started as a partnership of Charles Merrill and Edmund Lynch, and the comma between the names was dropped in 1938 when Mr. Lynch passed away. Now you sticklers for the truth won't have to Google it.

The real question is, why in the world did I think this simple cartoon needed such a long explanation?






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