Business -- Personnel & HR

National Business Employment Weekly, January 24, 1993


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Yes, I admit it, I think this has got to be one of my top five best cartoons ever. I love everything about it. Simple drawing, cleverly-worded caption and, when you finally get to the door, downright funny. Why The New Yorker ever rejected it is beyond me.

(Just to bring this into historical context -- in 1993, when this was printed, the U.S. was in the midst of a major unemployment crisis. It was before the age of computer job searches, and laid-off workers were sending out tons of resumes. But corporations were not yet in a hiring mode, and the resumes were mostly being ignored.)






The Wall Street Journal, December 18, 1997 and December 22, 1998


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Yes, that's absolutely correct, The Wall Street Journal printed this cartoon on December 18, 1997 and apparently liked it so much that they printed the exact same cartoon again a year later, on December 22, 1998. As one of my sons asked me in '98, "Did you get paid for it again?" I'm almost certain that the answer was no. So it looks like you owe me one, WSJ.

Actually, over the years, this type of thing happened to me on several occasions with other publications (but only this one time with The Wall Street Journal). Whenever it occured, I always chalked it up to either incredibly poor record-keeping or innocent human error. I can't imagine that any publication would deliberately want to repeat a cartoon that it had printed before.

Well, "to err is human, to forgive, divine". So all is forgiven, WSJ.






Selling Power, May 1993


selpow0593.JPG Another of my personal favorite gags -- good ol' Archie Andrews, the perennial high school student.

I was surprised that this cartoon didn't sell higher up in the publication chain (okay, maybe it's not New Yorker caliber, but both The Wall Street Journal and National Business Employment Weekly had a crack at it, and one of them really should have claimed it).

This drawing appears in a continuous cycle as "Cartoon of the Day" on Selling Power's website sellingpower.com. But, unfortunately, somebody completely changed the caption on the site, thereby ruining a perfectly good laugh. The caption on the website has some silly reference to Jughead. I alerted Selling Power's webmaster about this, but to my knowledge the caption has never been corrected.






National Business Employment Weekly, June 21, 1987


nbew062187.JPG I got involved pretty early when this Dow-Jones publication was launched. NBEW only printed one cartoon per weekly issue. Their editorial offices were in Princeton, New Jersey, so I didn't have any personal contact, except occasionally by phone. The first editor, Ellen Kolton, LOVED my cartoons and puchased them like they were going out of style, sometimes as many as five at a time. Of course, we cartoonists realize that this sort of thing can't possibly last, and sure enough Ellen eventually left NBEW to work for INC. magazine (which has never published cartoons, by the way). I was so devastated that I called her at INC., at their Massachusetts office, and jokingly pleaded with her to get back to NBEW, or at least convince INC. to start using cartoons. I still remember one of her kindly comments to me over the phone: "Y'know, The New Yorker publishes cartoons, too!"

Anyway, and inevitably, her replacement wasn't so enthusiastic about my work, but still kept buying at a decent pace, out of habit, I imagine. Then more editors came and went, and each one seemed even less enthusiastic. Sales came fewer and farther apart, until the publication folded in 1999. According to my records, NBEW printed 113 of my cartoons, which I consider a pretty good run.

Aside: For a while there, it seemed like there was a contest between me and New Yorker cartoonist Tom Cheney as to who would be the principal cartoonist at NBEW. In the end, Cheney won out easily. The late Henry Martin, another New Yorker cartoonist, also appeared regularly. When a small paperback of the best cartoons from NBEW was printed, I had six cartoons included, and Cheney had about ten times as many.

Cartoon Editors should never change jobs -- unless they're not buying my cartoons, of course!






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