The Eli Stein School of Gagwriting


(Don't worry -- you won't need a credit card)

Lesson One: I've always believed that a cartoon caption is funnier if it is posed in the form of a question -- if possible -- rather than in the form of a declarative statement. I feel that the question format effectively invites the reader to participate in the humor, perhaps even prompting the reader to silently but knowingly answer the question posed.

I realize that this is somewhat like what Neil Simon has one of his characters saying in one of his plays -- the old comedian who adamantly insists, and I'm paraphrasing here, "You know what's funny? Words with a 'k' are funny -- 'pickles' is a funny word."

Well, pickles IS a funny word, isn't it?? Notice how that last question got you involved?

End of Lesson One, and probably the end of the Eli Stein School of Gagwriting.




Good Housekeeping, February, 2006





American Legion, January 2001





The National Law Journal, December 4, 2000





Medical Economics, April 7, 2006





The Wall Street Journal, September 20, 2005





The Wall Street Journal, July 12, 1957


wsj071257.JPG This was my first sale to a major market. It was printed in 1957, but I remember making the sale in 1956.

Charles Preston was the man who, more than fifty years ago, convinced The Wall Street Journal to start printing a cartoon every day, and to this day he's still at the helm of their "Pepper . . . and Salt" feature.

I remember visiting Preston many times in his Lexington Avenue office on Wednesdays, which was "Looking Day" for the local cartoonists. Unfortunately, I don't have a photo of the young, dashing Charles Preston of those days, but I have this photo of him and myself at the 50th Anniversary celebration/exhibit, which was held at the World Financial Center in 1999. preston.jpg That's Preston on the left, me on the right.




Lion, July 1958





The Wall Street Journal, November 10, 1969





National Observer, February 26, 1968





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