January 2008

The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 2, 1992


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I have to confess a soft spot in my heart for this gag, too. And I remember researching wine names for an appropriate one to use, since I know practically nothing about the subject.






Teaching K-8, October 2000


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Teaching K-8 was a publication geared for teachers of pre-kindergarten to eighth grade. It traditionally carried two cartoons in each issue. Unfortunately, it folded in 2007.






Graphic Arts Monthly, November 1984


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Chapter 11, of course, is the bankruptcy protection clause. This cartoon was drawn specifically with Graphic Arts Monthly in mind, so I made it a Printing Company.






Buy-Lines, July 8, 1984


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I think there was a sharp increase in the price of food and stuff at the supermarket, when I drew this gag in the early 1980's.






Florida Bar News, June 1, 2000


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This "Baby Boomer Judge" gag was another one of my personal favorites. I was so sorry it didn't get picked up by a major publication like The Wall Street Journal, The National Law Journal or even The New Yorker! I still think it's great.






"The Professional School of Cartooning" (1947)


By popular demand (from Mike Lynch), here are profiles of the five other instructors on the staff of "The Professional School of Cartooning". For further details, see my posting in "Eli's Corner" dated January 2, 2008, about the four cartooning Roth brothers. Lariar.jpgBoltinoff.jpgNofziger.jpgwolfe.jpgschus.jpg I wish I could give you updates on all these cartoonists, but I have very little info to impart. All of them were prolific and popular gag cartoonists in 1947. Of course, Lawrence Lariar (apparently the founder and "Executive Director" of this correspondence school) was also a Cartoon Editor for several major publications, and also an anthologist of a great many cartoon book collections.

Wow, Adolph Schus was selling cartoons in 1926 -- now, that makes me feel young!






The Wall Street Journal, December 1, 2000


wsj120100.jpg Notice that WSJ cropped my drawing, on the bottom, and then had to re-position my signature.






More memorabilia - the four cartooning Roth brothers


I came across an old promotional brochure for "The Professional School of Cartooning" (Lawrence Lariar, Executive Director), from 1947 or 1948. Four of the featured instructors were the Roth brothers, gag cartoonists who each achieved varied levels of success in the profession. Only one of them, Ben Roth, retained the family name in print. His brothers worked under the pen names of Irving Roir, Salo and Al Ross. You probably recognize the name of Al Ross as the famed "New Yorker" cartoonist. I believe he's still actively cartooning, even though I haven't seen his work in "The New Yorker" for a long time. Here are their photos and sample cartoons, from the brochure: Roth Bros- - Al.jpgRoth Bros-- Ben.jpgRoth Bros- - Salo.jpgRoth Bros- - Roir.jpg Why my interest in the Roth brothers? I thought you'd never ask. My wife and I first traveled to Israel in 1983, and in our small mini-bus group were Ellen and Herb Deutsch of Buffalo Grove, Illinois. Our conversations eventually (and inevitably) got around to my gag cartooning, and Ellen reported excitedly that not only was her father a gag cartoonist, but so were her three uncles. I, of course, responded that they could only be the four Roth brothers. Ellen was amazed that I had heard of her father and uncles and I was amazed at what an incredibly small world we live in.

Which of the Roth brothers was her father? I'm sorry to say that I don't remember. But I'm sure that someone out there will supply that little bit of information . . . please!!

Oh, one more thing. My mother's maiden name was Roth, but I'm sure that's just another weird coincidence.