January 2007

Dartnell, October 11, 1994


dartn101194.JPG Dartnell Corp. publishes newsletters for business and industry on subjects like Salesmanship, Teamwork, Office Management, Supervision and Customer Service. For many years, a cartoon was regularly included in about a dozen of the titles. In 1999, Dartnell was bought up by another company and the parent company discontinued the cartoon use. I recently checked on the internet and found that Dartnell is still active in newsletter publishing, and still cartoonless.

From 1986 to 1999 I sold about 125 cartoons to Dartnell -- the subjects were right up my alley and I had many rejected cartoons from other publications to offer them. Unfortunately, the Dartnell editors were loathe to send tearsheets or clips of my published cartoons to me, no matter how often I asked for them. So I only have a small percentage of my Dartnell cartoons -- the few that I managed to scrounge from them or from various other sources.

As I've said before, I love to see my cartoons in print, and the sad fact is that, overall, I've never seen about 20% of my published cartoons. These are the ones that appeared in publications not readily available to the general public, or that could not be found on magazine racks. Most editors routinely send complimentary copies, or tearsheets, to their contributors, but there are always the few others who can't or won't be bothered. Very inconsiderate, in my opinion.






The Wall Street Journal, November 18, 1957


wsj111857.JPG

Another gag on the topic of those l-o-n-g cars they were producing in those days.






The Wall Street Journal, April 27, 1970


wsj042770.JPG This is another WSJ cartoon in which a lot of drawing detail was mysteriously lost in the reproduction. As I mentioned previously in a reply to a comment on another WSJ cartoon, there was a period of time when, for some strange reason, the "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoons were appearing so faintly that they almost disappeared. I remember a few Joe Mirachi cartoons that looked like a bunch of chicken scratchings, and you could barely tell what the drawings were supposed to represent. My guess is that the WSJ was experimenting with different scanning or copying techniques, and somewhere between the original drawing and the printed cartoon, almost all of the detail was being lost. I know I hadn't changed my drawing style or tools, so it certainly wasn't anything that we cartoonists were doing differently. I also recall that the problem prompted at least one sarcastic Letter to the Editor complaining about the "disappearing" cartoons.

I'm glad to say that the glitch, whatever it was, was finally resolved and the cartoon reproduction returned to normal.